China manufacturer 420 428 Chain 14-17t Front Sprocket 17mm for 50 70 90 110 125 140cc Dirt Bike

Product Description

420 428 Chain 14-17T Front Sprocket 17mm For 125 140cc Dirt Bike

 

Description:

– Different sizes available: 420 428 chain from 14 tooth to 17 tooth

Front engine sprocket:

– 420 17mm:14T 15T 16T 17T

– 428 17mm:14T 15T 16T 17T

 

Feature:

– Metal manufacturing, good corrosion resistance, heat resistance.

– Directly replace the old worn gears, the motorcycle works normally and is easy to install.

– Please verify model number and size prior to ordering to ensure this is the correct part for your motorcycle.

 

 Specification:

– Condition: 1pcs spark plugs per day.
Q3: How about your delivery time ?
A3: Delivery time is 20days after you confirmed order.
Q4: What is the benefit for the exclusive agency?
A4: 1.Market Protection
2.Special price or discount in some months
3.Priority delivery
4.Free promotion materials:T-shirt
Q7:Can you produce it with our sample?
A7:Yes ,we can.and we will make new mould according to your sample

 

Certification: CCC, CE
Color: Same as in Photo
Sample: Free Sample
Name: Sprocket
Transport Package: Cartonsbrand Inner Bag + Brand Small Box
Trademark: TLZBMTL
Samples:
US$ 0/Piece
1 Piece(Min.Order)

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Request Sample

Customization:
Available

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bike sprocket

Can I replace a worn-out bike sprocket, or do I need to change the entire drivetrain?

Replacing a worn-out bike sprocket is a common maintenance task and can be done independently without necessarily changing the entire drivetrain. The drivetrain of a bicycle typically consists of the chain, front chainrings, rear cassette sprockets, and derailleurs. Each component plays a crucial role in the smooth functioning of the drivetrain. Here’s what you need to consider when dealing with a worn-out bike sprocket:

  • Assessing Wear: Over time, sprockets can wear out due to regular use and exposure to dirt, grime, and debris. To determine if a sprocket is worn, you can visually inspect the teeth for signs of wear, such as sharp hook-like profiles, elongated teeth, or missing teeth. Additionally, a worn sprocket may cause the chain to slip or skip while pedaling.
  • Replacing Individual Components: If only the sprocket is worn, you can replace it independently. Most modern bicycles have a cassette system, where the rear sprockets are part of a single unit (cassette) that can be removed and replaced. On the other hand, some older or single-speed bikes may have a freewheel system, where the sprockets are threaded onto the hub. In either case, you can replace the worn sprockets with new ones of the appropriate size and speed compatibility.
  • Chain Compatibility: When replacing sprockets, it’s essential to consider the compatibility of the chain. A worn sprocket can accelerate chain wear, and using a new chain with worn sprockets can cause premature chain elongation and skipping. If the chain is relatively new and in good condition, replacing only the sprockets is often sufficient.
  • Upgrading the Drivetrain: In some cases, if multiple components of the drivetrain are significantly worn or damaged, it may be more cost-effective to replace the entire drivetrain as a set. This ensures that all components work optimally together and can improve overall shifting performance and longevity.
  • Seek Professional Help: If you’re unsure about how to replace the sprocket or assess the condition of the drivetrain, it’s best to seek help from a professional bike mechanic. They can inspect your bike, recommend appropriate replacements, and ensure that the new components are installed correctly.

Regular maintenance and timely replacement of worn components can extend the life of your bike’s drivetrain and enhance your riding experience. By replacing individual sprockets or the entire drivetrain when needed, you can keep your bicycle running smoothly and efficiently.

bike sprocket

How do I know if my bike sprockets are compatible with my chain and derailleurs?

Ensuring compatibility between bike sprockets, chains, and derailleurs is essential for smooth and efficient gear shifting. Here are the steps to determine if your bike sprockets are compatible:

1. Sprocket Type: Identify the type of sprocket setup on your bike. Most modern bicycles use cassette-style sprockets on the rear wheel and one to three chainrings at the front crankset. Make sure you know the number of sprockets on your cassette and the number of chainrings on your crankset.

2. Chain Speed: Check the speed of your bike’s chain. This refers to the number of rear sprockets and the corresponding chain width. Common chain speeds for modern bikes are 8-speed, 9-speed, 10-speed, 11-speed, or 12-speed. The chain speed must match the number of sprockets on the rear cassette.

3. Chain Width: Ensure that the chain width corresponds to the chain speed. For example, an 8-speed chain is wider than a 10-speed chain. Using the correct chain width is crucial for proper engagement with the sprockets and chainrings.

4. Derailleur Compatibility: Check if your derailleurs are compatible with the number of sprockets on the cassette and the chainrings. Different chain speeds require derailleurs with specific capacity and range to accommodate the various gear ratios.

5. Teeth Count: Consider the number of teeth on your chainrings and cassette sprockets. The chainrings’ teeth count affects the bike’s gear range and overall gearing ratios. Make sure the combination of chainrings and cassette sprockets provides the desired gear ratios for your riding style and terrain.

6. Brand and Model: When replacing sprockets, chains, or derailleurs, try to use components from the same brand and model series. Mixing different brands or models may lead to compatibility issues, affecting shifting performance.

7. Seek Professional Advice: If you are unsure about compatibility or need to make significant changes to your bike’s sprocket setup, it’s advisable to seek the advice of a professional bike mechanic or a knowledgeable cycling specialist. They can help you choose the appropriate components and ensure compatibility between the sprockets, chain, and derailleurs.

Proper compatibility between sprockets, chains, and derailleurs is crucial for optimal performance, smooth gear shifting, and overall riding experience. Taking the time to ensure compatibility and using quality components will contribute to a more enjoyable and efficient cycling experience.

bike sprocket

What are the different types of bike sprockets commonly used in bicycles?

In bicycles, there are two main types of sprockets used in the drivetrain: front sprockets (chainrings) and rear sprockets (cassette). Each type serves a different purpose and offers various gear ratios to accommodate different riding conditions. Here’s an overview of each:

1. Front Sprockets (Chainrings):

Front sprockets, also known as chainrings, are located at the crankset, which is attached to the bicycle’s pedals. There are typically one to three chainrings on the crankset, each with a different number of teeth. The number of teeth on the chainrings determines the gear ratio, affecting the bike’s speed and pedaling effort. Common configurations include:

  • Single Chainring: Bicycles with a single chainring are known as “1x” drivetrains. They are popular in mountain biking and some urban or gravel bikes. A single chainring simplifies shifting and reduces weight but may offer a more limited gear range.
  • Double Chainring: Bicycles with two chainrings are referred to as “2x” drivetrains. The two chainrings provide a wider gear range, offering both high and low gear ratios for various riding conditions.
  • Triple Chainring: In the past, triple chainrings (3x) were common on many road and hybrid bikes. However, they have become less prevalent in modern bicycles. Triple chainrings offer the widest gear range but are heavier and more complex to operate and maintain.

2. Rear Sprockets (Cassette):

The rear sprockets are part of the cassette, which is mounted on the rear wheel’s hub. The cassette typically contains 8 to 12 sprockets, each with a different number of teeth. The combination of the selected front chainring and the rear sprocket determines the gear ratio. Common configurations include:

  • Wide-Range Cassette: Wide-range cassettes, such as 11-42T or 11-50T, provide a broad gear range, suitable for mountain biking and off-road riding. They offer easier climbing gears and higher-speed gears for descents.
  • Close-Ratio Cassette: Close-ratio cassettes, like 11-25T or 11-28T, have smaller jumps between sprockets, providing more closely spaced gears. They are common in road biking and provide smoother gear transitions for maintaining a consistent cadence on flat terrain.
  • Gravel / Adventure Cassette: These cassettes are designed for mixed-terrain riding, offering a balance between wide-range and close-ratio cassettes.

Bike sprockets are available in various materials, including steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber. The choice of sprocket type and gear ratios depends on the rider’s preferences, riding style, and the terrain they intend to tackle. Modern bicycles often feature lightweight, durable, and efficient sprockets that enhance overall performance and riding experience.

China manufacturer 420 428 Chain 14-17t Front Sprocket 17mm for 50 70 90 110 125 140cc Dirt Bike  China manufacturer 420 428 Chain 14-17t Front Sprocket 17mm for 50 70 90 110 125 140cc Dirt Bike
editor by CX 2023-08-01