China Good quality Titanium Gr5 Tc4 Bike Accessories Bicycle OEM Parts Chainwheel Rear Sprocket

Product Description

Material 1) Aluminum: AL 6061-T6, 6063, 7075-T etc.
2) Stainless steel: 303,304,316L, 17-4(SUS630) etc.
3) Steel: 4140, Q235, Q345B,20#,45# etc.
4) Titanium: TA1,TA2/GR2, TA4/GR5, TC4, TC18 etc.
5) Brass: C36000 (HPb62), C37700 (HPb59), C26800 (H68), C22000(H90) etc.
6) Copper, bronze, Magnesium alloy, Delrin, POM,Acrylic, PC, etc.
Finish Sandblasting, Anodize color, Blackenning, Zinc/Nickl Plating, Polish.
Power coating, Passivation PVD, Titanium Plating, Electrogalvanizing.
Electroplating chromium, electrophoresis, QPQ(Quench-Polish-Quench).
Electro Polishing,Chrome Plating, Knurl, Laser etch Logo, etc.
Main Equipment CNC Machining center(Milling), CNC Lathe, Grinding machine.
Cylindrical grinder machine, Drilling machine, Laser Cutting Machine,etc.
Drawing format STEP,STP,GIS,CAD,PDF,DWG,DXF etc or samples. 
Tolerance +/-0.01mm ~ +/-0.05mm
Surface roughness  Ra 0.1~3.2
Inspection Complete inspection lab with Micrometer, Optical Comparator, Caliper Vernier,CMM.
Depth Caliper Vernier, Universal Protractor, Clock Gauge, Internal Centigrade Gauge.
Capacity CNC turning work range: φ0.5mm-φ150mm*300mm.
CNC milling work range: 510mm*1571mm*500mm.

 

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FAQ

Q1:What’s kinds of information you need for quotation?
HVS: You can provide 2D/3D drawing or send your sample to our factory, then we can make according to your sample.

 

Q2: Can we sign NDA?
HVS: Sure. We never divulge customers’ information to anyone else.

 

Q3: Do you provide sample?
HVS: Yes, we can provide you sample before mass order.

 

Q4: How can you ensure the quality?
HVS: We have profesional QC department to guarantee the quality.

 

Q5: Delivery time?
HVS: If in Stock: around 3 days after payment. Mass production: around 20~25 days after receipt of deposit (Accurate delivery time depends on specific items and quantities)

 

Q6: How about the transportation?
HVS: You can choose any mode of transportation you want, sea delivery, air delivery or door to door express.

 

After-sales Service: N.a.
Warranty: N.a.
Condition: New
Certification: CE, RoHS, ISO9001, IATF 16949
Standard: DIN, ASTM, GOST, GB, JIS, ANSI, BS
Customized: Customized
Samples:
US$ 10/Piece
1 Piece(Min.Order)

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Customization:
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bike sprocket

What are the signs of wear and tear in bike sprockets and how do I identify them?

Bike sprockets, also known as cassette sprockets or cogs, are an essential part of the drivetrain that can experience wear and tear over time. Regular inspection can help you identify signs of sprocket wear and determine when replacement is necessary. Here are the common signs of wear and tear in bike sprockets:

  • Hooked Teeth: Inspect the teeth of the sprockets. If you notice that the teeth have a hooked or shark fin-like appearance, it indicates significant wear. This occurs due to the chain wearing down the metal over time.
  • Pointed Teeth: Pointed teeth are another sign of wear, where the tops of the teeth become sharp and pointed instead of having a flat profile.
  • Worn Teeth: Look for flattened or thinned-out teeth, especially in the middle of the sprockets. Worn teeth can affect the chain’s engagement and lead to poor shifting performance.
  • Missing Teeth: If any teeth are completely missing from the sprocket, it’s a clear sign of excessive wear and a replacement is necessary.
  • Chain Skipping: When riding, if the chain skips or jumps over the sprockets, it indicates that the sprockets’ teeth are worn and no longer providing a smooth engagement with the chain.
  • Noisy Shifting: If you notice unusual noise during shifting, it could be due to the chain not meshing properly with the worn sprocket teeth.
  • Chain Elongation: Excessive sprocket wear can accelerate chain elongation, leading to further wear on the sprockets. If you notice your chain has elongated significantly, it’s time to inspect the sprockets for wear.

To identify these signs of wear, you can visually inspect the sprockets. You may need to remove the rear wheel and carefully examine the cassette or freewheel sprockets. Look for any irregularities in the teeth, and run your fingers along the tops of the teeth to feel for sharp points or rough edges.

Regular maintenance and cleaning of your bike’s drivetrain can help identify sprocket wear early on. By keeping the drivetrain clean, properly lubricated, and regularly replacing the chain, you can extend the life of your sprockets and other drivetrain components.

If you notice any of these signs of wear, it’s best to replace the worn sprockets promptly. Replacing sprockets before they become excessively worn can help maintain smooth shifting performance and prolong the life of the entire drivetrain.

bike sprocket

How do I upgrade bike sprockets to enhance my cycling experience?

Upgrading bike sprockets can significantly enhance your cycling experience, offering improved performance and a smoother ride. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to upgrade your bike sprockets:

  1. Identify Compatibility: Before proceeding with an upgrade, ensure that the new sprockets are compatible with your bike’s drivetrain system. Check the number of speeds on your cassette or freewheel and select sprockets with a matching speed rating.
  2. Choose the Right Material: Upgraded sprockets are often available in different materials like aluminum, titanium, or steel. Consider the benefits of each material, such as weight savings or durability, and choose the one that best suits your needs and riding style.
  3. Select the Tooth Count: The number of teeth on the sprockets determines the gear ratios and the range of speeds available. Choose a tooth count that complements your riding preferences. For example, a larger rear sprocket will provide easier gears for climbing, while a smaller sprocket offers higher gears for speed on flat terrain.
  4. Replace the Cassette or Freewheel: If upgrading individual sprockets is not feasible due to compatibility issues or wear, consider replacing the entire cassette or freewheel. This will ensure that all sprockets are new and function optimally together.
  5. Gather Tools: Depending on the type of sprocket and your bike’s drivetrain, you may need specific tools for removal and installation. Common tools include a chain whip, cassette lockring tool, and a wrench or socket for the lockring.
  6. Remove the Old Sprockets: Use the chain whip to hold the cassette or freewheel in place while using the lockring tool to loosen and remove the lockring. Carefully slide off the old sprockets, keeping them in order to help install the new ones correctly.
  7. Install the New Sprockets: Align the new sprockets correctly on the cassette or freewheel body, making sure they fit into the grooves. Hand-tighten the lockring before using the lockring tool to securely fasten it in place.
  8. Check Chain Length: Depending on the changes in tooth count or cassette size, you may need to adjust the chain length. A new, longer chain may be required if you’ve increased the size of the largest sprocket.
  9. Test Ride and Fine-Tune: Take your bike for a test ride to ensure smooth shifting and proper functionality. If necessary, fine-tune the derailleur’s indexing or limit screws to achieve precise shifting.
  10. Maintain Regularly: To keep your upgraded sprockets in top condition, perform regular maintenance. Clean and lubricate the drivetrain regularly, and inspect the sprockets for wear and damage.

Upgrading your bike sprockets can lead to a more enjoyable and efficient cycling experience. However, if you are unsure about the process or lack the necessary tools, consider seeking assistance from a professional bike mechanic.

bike sprocket

What are the different types of bike sprockets commonly used in bicycles?

In bicycles, there are two main types of sprockets used in the drivetrain: front sprockets (chainrings) and rear sprockets (cassette). Each type serves a different purpose and offers various gear ratios to accommodate different riding conditions. Here’s an overview of each:

1. Front Sprockets (Chainrings):

Front sprockets, also known as chainrings, are located at the crankset, which is attached to the bicycle’s pedals. There are typically one to three chainrings on the crankset, each with a different number of teeth. The number of teeth on the chainrings determines the gear ratio, affecting the bike’s speed and pedaling effort. Common configurations include:

  • Single Chainring: Bicycles with a single chainring are known as “1x” drivetrains. They are popular in mountain biking and some urban or gravel bikes. A single chainring simplifies shifting and reduces weight but may offer a more limited gear range.
  • Double Chainring: Bicycles with two chainrings are referred to as “2x” drivetrains. The two chainrings provide a wider gear range, offering both high and low gear ratios for various riding conditions.
  • Triple Chainring: In the past, triple chainrings (3x) were common on many road and hybrid bikes. However, they have become less prevalent in modern bicycles. Triple chainrings offer the widest gear range but are heavier and more complex to operate and maintain.

2. Rear Sprockets (Cassette):

The rear sprockets are part of the cassette, which is mounted on the rear wheel’s hub. The cassette typically contains 8 to 12 sprockets, each with a different number of teeth. The combination of the selected front chainring and the rear sprocket determines the gear ratio. Common configurations include:

  • Wide-Range Cassette: Wide-range cassettes, such as 11-42T or 11-50T, provide a broad gear range, suitable for mountain biking and off-road riding. They offer easier climbing gears and higher-speed gears for descents.
  • Close-Ratio Cassette: Close-ratio cassettes, like 11-25T or 11-28T, have smaller jumps between sprockets, providing more closely spaced gears. They are common in road biking and provide smoother gear transitions for maintaining a consistent cadence on flat terrain.
  • Gravel / Adventure Cassette: These cassettes are designed for mixed-terrain riding, offering a balance between wide-range and close-ratio cassettes.

Bike sprockets are available in various materials, including steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber. The choice of sprocket type and gear ratios depends on the rider’s preferences, riding style, and the terrain they intend to tackle. Modern bicycles often feature lightweight, durable, and efficient sprockets that enhance overall performance and riding experience.

China Good quality Titanium Gr5 Tc4 Bike Accessories Bicycle OEM Parts Chainwheel Rear Sprocket  China Good quality Titanium Gr5 Tc4 Bike Accessories Bicycle OEM Parts Chainwheel Rear Sprocket
editor by CX 2023-10-25