China Good quality 420 428 Chain 14-17t Front Sprocket 17mm for 50 70 90 110 125 140cc Dirt Bike

Product Description

420 428 Chain 14-17T Front Sprocket 17mm For 125 140cc Dirt Bike

 

Description:

– Different sizes available: 420 428 chain from 14 tooth to 17 tooth

Front engine sprocket:

– 420 17mm:14T 15T 16T 17T

– 428 17mm:14T 15T 16T 17T

 

Feature:

– Metal manufacturing, good corrosion resistance, heat resistance.

– Directly replace the old worn gears, the motorcycle works normally and is easy to install.

– Please verify model number and size prior to ordering to ensure this is the correct part for your motorcycle.

 

 Specification:

– Condition: 1pcs spark plugs per day.
Q3: How about your delivery time ?
A3: Delivery time is 20days after you confirmed order.
Q4: What is the benefit for the exclusive agency?
A4: 1.Market Protection
2.Special price or discount in some months
3.Priority delivery
4.Free promotion materials:T-shirt
Q7:Can you produce it with our sample?
A7:Yes ,we can.and we will make new mould according to your sample

 

Certification: CCC, CE
Name: Sprocket
Color: Same as in Photo
Sample: Free Sample
Transport Package: Cartonsbrand Inner Bag + Brand Small Box
Trademark: TLZBMTL
Samples:
US$ 0/Piece
1 Piece(Min.Order)

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Request Sample

Customization:
Available

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Customized Request

bike sprocket

What are the signs of wear and tear in bike sprockets and how do I identify them?

Bike sprockets, also known as cassette sprockets or cogs, are an essential part of the drivetrain that can experience wear and tear over time. Regular inspection can help you identify signs of sprocket wear and determine when replacement is necessary. Here are the common signs of wear and tear in bike sprockets:

  • Hooked Teeth: Inspect the teeth of the sprockets. If you notice that the teeth have a hooked or shark fin-like appearance, it indicates significant wear. This occurs due to the chain wearing down the metal over time.
  • Pointed Teeth: Pointed teeth are another sign of wear, where the tops of the teeth become sharp and pointed instead of having a flat profile.
  • Worn Teeth: Look for flattened or thinned-out teeth, especially in the middle of the sprockets. Worn teeth can affect the chain’s engagement and lead to poor shifting performance.
  • Missing Teeth: If any teeth are completely missing from the sprocket, it’s a clear sign of excessive wear and a replacement is necessary.
  • Chain Skipping: When riding, if the chain skips or jumps over the sprockets, it indicates that the sprockets’ teeth are worn and no longer providing a smooth engagement with the chain.
  • Noisy Shifting: If you notice unusual noise during shifting, it could be due to the chain not meshing properly with the worn sprocket teeth.
  • Chain Elongation: Excessive sprocket wear can accelerate chain elongation, leading to further wear on the sprockets. If you notice your chain has elongated significantly, it’s time to inspect the sprockets for wear.

To identify these signs of wear, you can visually inspect the sprockets. You may need to remove the rear wheel and carefully examine the cassette or freewheel sprockets. Look for any irregularities in the teeth, and run your fingers along the tops of the teeth to feel for sharp points or rough edges.

Regular maintenance and cleaning of your bike’s drivetrain can help identify sprocket wear early on. By keeping the drivetrain clean, properly lubricated, and regularly replacing the chain, you can extend the life of your sprockets and other drivetrain components.

If you notice any of these signs of wear, it’s best to replace the worn sprockets promptly. Replacing sprockets before they become excessively worn can help maintain smooth shifting performance and prolong the life of the entire drivetrain.

bike sprocket

Can bike sprockets be customized for specific riding styles or terrains?

Yes, bike sprockets can be customized to suit specific riding styles and terrains. The sprocket setup, also known as the gear ratio, plays a crucial role in determining the bike’s performance and suitability for different conditions. Here’s how sprockets can be customized:

1. Number of Teeth:

The number of teeth on the sprockets affects the gear ratio, which determines how easy or hard it is to pedal in different situations. Larger front chainrings (more teeth) offer higher gear ratios, providing more speed and efficiency on flat terrain and downhills. Smaller front chainrings (fewer teeth) create lower gear ratios, making it easier to pedal uphill or in challenging off-road conditions. Rear sprockets, or cassettes, also come in various sizes, offering further customization options.

2. Single-Speed vs. Multi-Speed:

Single-speed bikes have one front chainring and one rear sprocket. They are simple, low-maintenance options suitable for flat terrain or city commuting. On the other hand, multi-speed bikes (commonly with 7 to 12 speeds) provide a wide range of gear ratios, allowing riders to tackle different terrains effectively. Mountain bikes and road bikes often have multi-speed drivetrains for versatility.

3. Gear Range:

The gear range refers to the difference in gear ratios between the highest and lowest gears. Bikes intended for off-road or hilly terrain typically have a wide gear range, allowing riders to handle steep climbs and fast descents. Road bikes designed for speed may have a narrower gear range to focus on high-speed efficiency.

4. Aftermarket Upgrades:

Cyclists can customize their sprockets by purchasing aftermarket chainrings and cassettes. These upgrades may offer different tooth configurations, materials, and weight savings. However, it’s essential to ensure compatibility with the bike’s drivetrain and consider any adjustments required to maintain smooth shifting.

5. Bike Intended Use:

The choice of sprockets also depends on the intended use of the bike. For example, downhill mountain bikes benefit from lower gear ratios for steep descents, while gravel bikes might have a wider gear range to handle both off-road and paved surfaces.

6. Personal Preference:

Ultimately, the customization of sprockets depends on the rider’s preferences and riding style. Some cyclists may prioritize speed and power on flat roads, while others may prefer easier gearing for tackling rough terrains and long climbs.

When customizing sprockets, it’s essential to consider the overall compatibility with the bike’s drivetrain, as well as the potential impact on shifting performance. Consulting a knowledgeable bike mechanic or specialist can help you choose the ideal sprocket setup that best suits your specific riding needs and enhances your cycling experience.

bike sprocket

Can you explain the function of front and rear bike sprockets?

In a bicycle’s drivetrain, both front and rear sprockets play crucial roles in determining the bike’s gear ratios and overall performance. Let’s look at the functions of each:

1. Front Sprockets (Chainrings):

Front sprockets, also known as chainrings, are located at the crankset, which is attached to the bicycle’s pedals. They come in various sizes, commonly referred to by the number of teeth they have. The main function of the front sprockets is to transfer the rider’s pedaling power to the rear wheel through the chain. Here’s how they work:

  • Gear Ratio Selection: Bicycles often have multiple chainrings with different tooth counts. By shifting the chain between these chainrings using the front derailleur, the rider can choose different gear ratios. Smaller chainrings are typically used for easier climbing and lower speeds, while larger chainrings provide higher speeds on flat terrain or descents.
  • Change in Gear Ratios: When the chain moves between different-sized chainrings, the effective gear ratio changes. Moving to a larger chainring provides a higher gear, requiring more effort but enabling faster speeds. Conversely, shifting to a smaller chainring gives a lower gear, requiring less effort but offering easier pedaling, especially on inclines.

2. Rear Sprockets (Cassette):

The rear sprockets are part of the cassette, which is mounted on the rear wheel’s hub. Like the front sprockets, the rear sprockets also come in different sizes, with each sprocket having a specific number of teeth. The functions of the rear sprockets are as follows:

  • Gear Ratio Fine-Tuning: The cassette offers more gear ratio options, providing finer adjustments to the bike’s gearing. By shifting the chain between different sprockets using the rear derailleur, the rider can fine-tune their gear ratio to match the terrain and riding conditions more precisely.
  • Combination with Front Sprockets: The interaction between the front and rear sprockets allows for a wide range of gear ratios. By selecting an appropriate combination of front and rear sprockets, cyclists can optimize their pedaling efficiency, maintain a consistent cadence, and achieve comfortable speeds for different situations.

Together, the front and rear sprockets form the bicycle’s gear system, enabling riders to tackle various terrains and adapt their pedaling effort to different riding conditions. By understanding how to use the sprockets effectively, cyclists can make the most out of their bike’s capabilities and enjoy a smoother, more efficient, and enjoyable riding experience.

China Good quality 420 428 Chain 14-17t Front Sprocket 17mm for 50 70 90 110 125 140cc Dirt Bike  China Good quality 420 428 Chain 14-17t Front Sprocket 17mm for 50 70 90 110 125 140cc Dirt Bike
editor by CX 2023-11-21